Apr. 15, 2018

Hiding the truth, at least for a while...

The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: Murder at Sorrow’s Crown by Steven Savile and Robert Greenberger

What could be behind the death of a soldier that warrants a conspiracy?

A lady shows up at Baker Street asking Holmes for help in finding out the truth about her son. He was part of the Boer War in South Africa, and her majesty’s government lists him as MIA. She has been told that they are listing him as a deserter, something that neither she nor anyone who knew the lad will accept…

Somehow all of this ties in with the death of Benjamin Disraeli…

When Holmes and Watson begin to investigate, they are attacked again and again. Some of their attackers are trained assassins from India. Holmes and Watson are waylaid both together and on their own.

The premise of this novel is that it records a truth that the government and the crown want to be buried. It could not have been published at the time, and in fact, Watson is warned in no uncertain terms not to publish, and his notes are confiscated by Whitehall…

The story is written in two parts. The first gives detail as the case developed. This part was taken away by a very serious agent who works for Mycroft. The second is written six months to a year after the case was finalized. Watson refuses to change the names of persons involved or to sugarcoat the alarming facts. He says the world needs to know the truth, and that by the time this case will be allowed to be published it will no longer matter.

This is a very dark case. The Boer War saw many British soldiers killed. There were battles where Britain found themselves on the losing side. This story deals with matters of national defense and raises questions about the death of Benjamin Disraeli. The question really is: What if?

I give the book four stars…

Quoth the Raven…

Buy it here>