Aug. 30, 2018

The Ape Man ages somewhat…

Tarzan and the Revolution by Thomas Zachek

This is a story in the Wild Adventures of Edgar Rice Burroughs series. Tarzan has forsaken England and now lives on his African estate.

The book has everything that makes for a good Tarzan adventure. The lost city of Opar, the Waziri, an ancient witch-doctor, Tarzan’s temporary capture, and a ruthless dictator create the backdrop for the story.

The new dictator, a man known as General Obutu, is causing havoc in central Africa. His men raid local villages, taking boys to train as Obutu’s army. Other children are held hostage to force the villagers to cooperate.

When the dictator’s troops raid the Waziri villages, they have a different scheme in mind. Obutu knows that the Waziri have access to the gold stores of Opar. What he doesn’t know is where the city is located. By kidnapping the children he wants to make the Waziri bring the gold to him. He is demanding a huge amount.

Not content with kidnapping scores of African children, Obutu has also seized Americans. Some are members of the Peace Corps. One is a reporter who came to Africa hoping to interview Tarzan…

I found it a bit odd that Opar has no sign of habitation. Of course, La would be dead by now, but there should be descendants of the original people of Opar, one would think...

The action is well paced, and the storyline is strong. The only thing I didn’t like was that Tarzan is going gray and seems to have lost his sense of danger. Part of the mystique of Tarzan is that he doesn’t age, but maybe his potions ran out. Who knows?

He is knocked unconscious by someone who managed to sneak up on the Ape Man. At one point he is so injured that he must seek out witch-doctor Azi. He is so far gone that he cannot reach Azi before collapsing. Fortune favors the brave, and Azi is able to find and treat Tarzan.

I do salute the author for making Tarzan a tad less superhuman. But amnesia and madness would fit more into the original series. This happened from time to time in the series. During his battle with Kerchak, king of the apes, he was badly wounded. This makes him susceptible to periods of madness. Often this is caused by further blows to the head. In this story, age makes him more vulnerable.

The story does make interesting reading. I give the book four stars…

Quoth the Raven…

Buy It Here>