Greetings from The Raven!

Oct. 13, 2018

Sherlock Holmes and The Green Lama: The Heir Apparent

Adam Lance Garcia, author

The story begins with a story of the new Green Lama, Jean Ferrell. Jean begins to read a story of her illustrious predecessor, Jethro Dumont.

Jethro is in London and is sought out by Sherlock Holmes. A cult of green-robed assassins is menacing the city. They are lead by a man called The Heir. The Heir is seeking to destroy Dumont, whom he refers to as “the imposter.” The Heir believes the mantle of the Green Lama is his birthright!

Adam, you let me down a bit with this one. It doesn’t have the usual pop of your Green Lama tales. I’m not sure exactly what the trouble is, but I probably like this one the least. It just doesn’t feel right. I’m sorry, my friend.

I give this one three stars…

Quoth the Raven…

Buy It Here>

 

Oct. 13, 2018

Sherlock Holmes in the World of HG Wells Volume Two

Edited by Derrick Belanger and C Edward Davis

Another blend of Holmes and science fiction worlds!

My thanks go out to Derrick Belanger for my copy of this book. I appreciate his continued faith in my reviews.

Taken as a whole, this volume is fabulous! Each author has blended Well’s worlds into the world of Holmes like an expert bartender. They are excellent Holmes stories while remaining also fitting for the Time Traveler, Dr. Moreau, the Invisible Man, etc.

Now, let’s move on to the stories:

“The Adventure of the Red Planet” by Steve Poling is perhaps more in the vein of Edgar Rice Burroughs’s vision of mars, but the story is very good…

“The Clash of the Miracle Men” by Rohit Sawant is based on the Wells story “The Man Who Could Work Miracles.” There is a neat twist in this story.

“The First Selenites on the Earth” Derek Nason reverses the plot of Wells’ “First Men in the Moon.” In this story, Professor Cavor brings Moon Men to the Earth.

“The Martian Spy Glass” by Jaap Boekestein deals with a crystal from a meteorite. A man uses it to view events on Mars. This is based on the story “The Crystal Egg.”

“The Adventures of the Bestial Excisions” by Benjamin Langley concerns Holmes and Watson landing on the island of a certain vivisectionist...

“The Adventure of the Disintegrated Man” by Michael T Wells has Holmes investigating ashes and an arm, which is all that is left of a man… I am not sure which story inspired this tale.

“Sherlock Holmes and the New Accelerator” by Mark Levy concerns an impossible theft happens under Holmes’ nose. This is based on Wells’ “The New Accelerator” from the pages of the Strand Magazine.

“A Trap to Catch the Sun” by Andrew Lane is a tale of grave robbery and unusual jewelry. Again, I am not certain of the source of inspiration.

“The Misplaced Mystery Writer” by Richard Paolinelli is based on “The Time Machine.” Wells has built the machine himself and already tested it. He has taken Edgar Allan Poe with him and lost him in time. Kudos for the explanation of Poe’s death and the long-lost identity of Jack the Ripper! Best in Book!

“The Beast Within” by Katie Magnusson concerns Silver, a wolf-like woman in a freak show. She is from the island of a certain vivisectionist…

“Dr. Watson and the Martians” by C. Edward Davis has Dr. Watson wandering a London decimated by the War of the Worlds…

“Dr. Watson’s Fragments: The Shape of Deductions to Come” has no given author. A certain blue box lands inside 221B. I got the mental picture of Tom Baker as the Doctor while reading this!

Derrick, you have a wonderful series going here. I would love to see more volumes! This book I give five stars!

Quoth the Raven…

Buy It Here>

 

Oct. 13, 2018

 

Sherlock Holmes Adventures in the Realms of HG Wells Volume 1 edited by Derrick Belanger and C Edward Davis

My thanks go out to Derrick Belanger for my copy of this book. I appreciate his continued faith in my reviews.

Taken as a whole, this volume is fabulous! Each author has blended Well’s worlds into the world of Holmes like an expert bartender. They are excellent Holmes stories while remaining also fitting for the Time Traveler, Dr. Moreau, the Invisible Man, etc.

Now, let’s move on to the stories:

 “The Case of a Natural Solution by MM Elmendorf is a pleasant romp into The War of the Worlds. In a London ravaged by the Martians, Holmes is working on something to destroy their army…

 “The Pigeon’s Rest” by Emma Tompkins takes the reader into Holmes’ investigation into a jewel theft. He works the case for a rival detective named Asquith. I must confess that I liked this story the least. Unless I missed something, I had a difficult time with the link to HG Wells…

 “The Curious Case of the Sleeper” by Stephen Herczeg delves into a tale more reminiscent of Washington Irving than HG Wells. I did enjoy this story, bravo!

 “The Manor House Horror” by Michael Silverling ties for Best-in-book! It combines nuances of The War of the Worlds, The Island of Dr. Moreau, and The Invisible Man! The flow is seamless and the action superb! My hat is off to the author!

 “An Adventure in Darkness” by Daniel D Victor combines Holmes with “The Country of the Blind.” Holmes undertakes the case for a blind woman married to Juan Carlos Nuñez from that story…

 “The Adventure of the Traveler’s Bootstraps” by Campbell Powell has Holmes meet the Time Traveler. The twist in the tale is quite amazing!

 “The Mystery of the Last Martian” by GC Rosenquist takes place in a London ravaged by the tripods and heat rays of the invading Martians. Now, one has invaded 221B…

 “The Affair of the Red Opium” by John Linwood Grant deals with the fallout from The First Men in the Moon…

 “The Adventure of the Invisible Man” needs no explanation about its source material. The story goes somewhat further than Well’s story, and casts doubt upon the death of Griffin…

 “A Matter of Some Gravity” by Derrick Belanger is an excellent read! People and events from The First Men in the Moon weave in and out of the story. I’ve seldom seen the type of narration this story presents. Some people may accuse me of kissing up, but this story ties for best-in-book!

I couldn’t with a clean conscience give this exciting book anything less than five stars plus! It is a refreshing blend of Holmes and Wells!

Quoth the Raven…

Buy It Here>

Aug. 30, 2018

Tarzan and the Revolution by Thomas Zachek

This is a story in the Wild Adventures of Edgar Rice Burroughs series. Tarzan has forsaken England and now lives on his African estate.

The book has everything that makes for a good Tarzan adventure. The lost city of Opar, the Waziri, an ancient witch-doctor, Tarzan’s temporary capture, and a ruthless dictator create the backdrop for the story.

The new dictator, a man known as General Obutu, is causing havoc in central Africa. His men raid local villages, taking boys to train as Obutu’s army. Other children are held hostage to force the villagers to cooperate.

When the dictator’s troops raid the Waziri villages, they have a different scheme in mind. Obutu knows that the Waziri have access to the gold stores of Opar. What he doesn’t know is where the city is located. By kidnapping the children he wants to make the Waziri bring the gold to him. He is demanding a huge amount.

Not content with kidnapping scores of African children, Obutu has also seized Americans. Some are members of the Peace Corps. One is a reporter who came to Africa hoping to interview Tarzan…

I found it a bit odd that Opar has no sign of habitation. Of course, La would be dead by now, but there should be descendants of the original people of Opar, one would think...

The action is well paced, and the storyline is strong. The only thing I didn’t like was that Tarzan is going gray and seems to have lost his sense of danger. Part of the mystique of Tarzan is that he doesn’t age, but maybe his potions ran out. Who knows?

He is knocked unconscious by someone who managed to sneak up on the Ape Man. At one point he is so injured that he must seek out witch-doctor Azi. He is so far gone that he cannot reach Azi before collapsing. Fortune favors the brave, and Azi is able to find and treat Tarzan.

I do salute the author for making Tarzan a tad less superhuman. But amnesia and madness would fit more into the original series. This happened from time to time in the series. During his battle with Kerchak, king of the apes, he was badly wounded. This makes him susceptible to periods of madness. Often this is caused by further blows to the head. In this story, age makes him more vulnerable.

The story does make interesting reading. I give the book four stars…

Quoth the Raven…

Buy It Here>

           

Aug. 30, 2018

Sherlock Holmes Adventures in the Realms of HG Wells Volume 1 edited by Derrick Belanger and C Edward Davis

My thanks go out to Derrick Belanger for my copy of this book. I appreciate his continued faith in my reviews.

Taken as a whole, this volume is fabulous! Each author has blended Well’s worlds into the world of Holmes like an expert bartender. They are excellent Holmes stories while remaining also fitting for the Time Traveler, Dr. Moreau, the Invisible Man, etc.

Now, let’s move on to the stories:

 “The Case of a Natural Solution by MM Elmendorf is a pleasant romp into The War of the Worlds. In a London ravaged by the Martians, Holmes is working on something to destroy their army…

 “The Pigeon’s Rest” by Emma Tompkins takes the reader into Holmes’ investigation into a jewel theft. He works the case for a rival detective named Asquith. I must confess that I liked this story the least. Unless I missed something, I had a difficult time with the link to HG Wells…

 “The Curious Case of the Sleeper” by Stephen Herczeg delves into a tale more reminiscent of Washington Irving than HG Wells. I did enjoy this story, bravo!

 “The Manor House Horror” by Michael Silverling ties for Best-in-book! It combines nuances of The War of the Worlds, The Island of Dr. Moreau, and The Invisible Man! The flow is seamless and the action is superb! My hat is off to the author!

 “An Adventure in Darkness” by Daniel D Victor combines Holmes with “The Country of the Blind.” Holmes undertakes the case for a blind woman married to Juan Carlos Nuñez from that story…

 “The Adventure of the Traveler’s Bootstraps” by Campbell Powell has Holmes meet the Time Traveler. The twist in the tale is quite amazing!

 “The Mystery of the Last Martian” by GC Rosenquist takes place in a London ravaged by the tripods and heat rays of the invading Martians. Now, one has invaded 221B…

 “The Affair of the Red Opium” by John Linwood Grant deals with the fallout from The First Men in the Moon…

 “The Adventure of the Invisible Man” needs no explanation about its source material. The story goes somewhat further than Well’s story, and casts doubt upon the death of Griffin…

 “A Matter of Some Gravity” by Derrick Belanger is an excellent read! People and events from The First Men in the Moon weave in and out of the story. I’ve seldom seen the type of narration this story presents. Some people may accuse me of kissing up, but this story ties for best-in-book!

I couldn’t with a clean conscience give this exciting book anything less than five stars plus! It is a refreshing blend of Holmes and Wells!

Quoth the Raven…

Buy It Here>